© 2017 OA Knee Pain. All Rights Reserved.

The PCL is a band of tissue that connects the shin bone to your thigh bone. Damage to this area caused by a fall or trauma can leave you immobile for weeks or even months. To make a full recovery, it is important that you have access to suitable care as a PCL knee injury can cause problems in later life, such as arthritis.

Measuring a PCL Injury

If you have a PCL injury, it will be classified into one of three categories:

  • Grade 1 is for a partial tear.
  • Grade 2 is for a partial tear that leaves the ligament loose.
  • Grade 3 is for a complete tear causing instability in the knee.
Posterior Cruciate Ligament - PCL Tear - OA Knee Pain If you have a PCL injury, it will be classified into one of three categories

Symptoms of a PCL Injury

The most obvious symptom is pain in the knee, however, some people often hear a “popping” sound when they are injured. Other symptoms include:

  • Swelling
  • A loose feeling in the knee
  • Difficulty putting weight on the knee

If the pain is unbearable, you should visit your nearest A&E department as soon as possible. If you are not hurting badly, don’t ignore the injury and book an appointment with your GP. A PCL injury is usually easily identified by a simple examination, however, an X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan may also be used to diagnose the injury.

Preventing Injury

To avoid a PCL injury, the best thing you can do is ensure you have a proper warmup and cool down when exercising. If playing or participating in a sport likely to cause damage to your knees, you should ensure you wear appropriate safety gear to keep you protected from any knocks or bumps.

Treatment

If you suspect you have suffered a PCL injury, you can start treatment at home using the PRICE method. This involves:

  • Protecting the joint from further damage by using a brace
  • Resting the joint as much as possible
  • Icing the joint for 15-minutes then leaving for an hour
  • Compressing the joint with a brace or bandage
  • Elevating the joint above the level of your heart

Once you have visited your GP and had the injury diagnosed, there is a number of solutions available to you. Firstly, if you’ve suffered a grade one or two injury, suitable treatment might be physical therapy and strengthening exercises. During this time, a knee brace may be worn to offer protection and support to the knee. Crutches may be necessary if you are struggling to bear the weight.


Movement therapy might also be a suitable form of treatment. This involves putting your leg through its range of motion by hand, in a pool or by using a machine.

If you have suffered a grade three injury, it is likely you need to have the torn ligament reattached to the bone. This is done through either open knee surgery or by using an arthroscope.

How would you rate the information on this page? (Your feedback is greatly appreciated)

Sign up to the OA Knee Pain newsletter

OA Knee Pain Social Board

Bringing you the latest news, research and treatment breakthroughs from the world of osteoarthritis

Visit our blog

Filter
  • twitter
  • blog
#

Why is it important to focus on multiple treatment options simultaneously?


Because there is no stand-out, totally effective single treatment for osteoarthritis, people with the condition often find it best to put together a personal portfolio of treatments that will work together to help relieve pain and improve mobility. The combination that works for one person may not work for another, so it’s important to understand what’s available, how effective it is and whether it will help your personal condition.

#

What are the top 10 most common causes of osteoarthritis?


Osteoarthritis, or OA, is a degenerative joint condition that affects over 8 million people in the UK. This disease is the most common form of arthritis, and is particularly prevalent amongst the older population. Affecting the cartilage in a joint, osteoarthritis can result in pain, stiffness and reduced mobility.

#

National Arthritis Week 2017


The week commencing 9th October 2017 is National Arthritis Awareness week, a campaign run by Arthritis Research UK with the aim of raising awareness of Arthritis and the impact that is has on the UK.

Offloading knee braces have been a hot topic in the press recently but just how do they work? And can they help you… https://t.co/MqUNcwIbFK

#

Offloading knee braces in the press: How do they work? And can they help you?


Today (3rd October 2017) the Daily Express published an article in which Sharron Davies has spoken out about her knee pain and how an offloading brace has helped. “Sharron believes the brace has transformed her life and is keen for people to be more aware of their options if they are told they need a knee replacement.” With this sentiment in mind, and the fact that offloading knee braces have been the topic of discussion in a number of publications in recent weeks, OA Knee Pain has looked into the Unloader One® by Össur. This popular knee brace is worn by Sharron Davies and a number of other well known figures to help ease and manage knee pain.