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When is knee replacement surgery offered or suggested for osteoarthritis? The worst cases of OA - those that are creating considerable pain or restricting a patient’s everyday activities more than is acceptable - could be referred for surgery. Today, hip and knee replacements are common and highly successful operations that improve the lives of thousands of people every year, who find their mobility vastly improved by the procedure. The first knee replacement was performed way back in 1968. Early artificial knees were made like hinges; therefore, they would not allow the knee to move in a natural way. Perhaps unsurprisingly, many artificial knees failed soon after surgery; as a result, surgeons tended to only perform them in older patients, where a second operation would not be required.Over the decades, the artificial knee joints have been greatly developed, with improvements in both techniques and the materials used meaning that knee implants are now routinely performed on younger patients. Constant developments and improvements mean both hip and knee replacements continue to become more effective; in addition, new, longer-lasting materials mean the operation no longer has to be repeated every ten years or so.

Joint pain – do’s & don’ts If the knee, the hip or other joints are troubling you then here are a few “Do’s and don’ts” you should consider which can influence the progression of your osteoarthritis. Do: Visit the doctor if you have joint pain. Don’t: Keep suffering silently. Do: Work out on a regular basis. Don’t: Slacken off and avoid activity. Do: Lead a health-conscious lifestyle Don’t: Smoke and excessively consume alcohol Do: Calorie conscious and joint-friendly nutrition (little meat and animal fat, a lot of fruit, vegetables, vegetable oil and salt-water fish), reduce overweight Don’t: Overeat on sweats and animal fat, gain weight Do: Wear well-fitting shoes with low heels, cushioning soles and insoles if needed Don’t: High heels, too tight or pointed shoes with thin soles or slanting heels Do: Use ergonomic tools and household aids, trolleys and a walking aid Don’t: Be too proud to use medical devices

Progressive technology is consistantly changing our lives, here we look at how robot technology can revolutionise total knee replacement surgery

Physical therapy is often a recommended part of managing knee osteoarthrtis but a study showed that Tai Chi was equally as helpful for knee OA.

Did you know there are different stages of Osteoarthritis? You can read about each stage here: Stages of Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Bracing and taping are both popular options following an injury, but which one is better and what is the difference between them? A complete review on taping versus bracing (post injury) / Össur Webshop Blog - http://bit.ly/2mTwWcY

Discover the effects of knee osteoarthritis around the world Osteoarthritis is generally believed to be the biggest cause of disability in older adults. As such, it affects millions of people and costs governments billions of pounds in treatments. Worldwide, an estimated 10%-15% of all adults aged 60 and over have some degree of osteoarthritis (often abbreviated to OA). In Britain, more than 8 million people - 33% of people aged over 45 years, plus 49% of women and 42% of men aged 75 and over - have been treated for OA. An estimated 4.7 million of those affected have arthritis of the knee. Let’s take a look at the facts Osteoarthritis is a very common condition which causes joints to become stiff and painful. It can affect all the joints in the body but is most likely to develop in the knees, hips and in the hands. Symptoms include swelling, redness, pain and stiffness in the affected joint, which usually lead to reduced movement and, in the worst cases, the inability to carry out everyday tasks. In the case of OA of the knee and hip, for instance, it can lead to difficulty in walking. It is not known what causes OA, but certain factors, such as being overweight, overuse and injury and just plain old getting older, are known to increase your likelihood of developing it. Genetic factors also play a part - a family history of OA increases your chance of getting it yourself. Diagnosis of OA usually includes an examination of the affected joints, plus questioning about symptoms and other factors. Your doctor will probably be able to diagnose the condition without any invasive tests, depending on your answers to certain questions. Unfortunately, there is currently no cure for OA, but it can be treated and may improve over time. Most treatments concentrate on easing the symptoms.

The iliotibial band (ITB) is not a muscle but a thick band of connective tissue that stretches from the outside of the pelvis down past the knee joint to the outside of the shin bone (tibia). The ITB passes over the knee joint and so this can occur with other knee problems, such as issues with the cartilage. There is also a nerve that is called the peroneal nerve that passes very close to where the ITB inserts, and this too can be a source of symptoms in this area. So it is important to get an accurate diagnosis before thinking about what treatment is best.

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