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Symptoms of Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) can affect any joint in the body, with the most common affected areas including the knees, hips and hands. Symptoms are usually experienced in one or two joints, but it is not unusual for people to suffer from more at any one time.

The symptoms of OA can be sporadic, meaning that they come and go at varying levels of severity. Some people find that the weather (in particular, damp weather or drops in atmospheric pressure) make symptoms worse, while others complain that it is related to how active you are. In some extreme cases, symptoms can be continuous.

Both instances can make it difficult to carry out simple daily tasks, such as using stairs or getting up from a seat or even sleeping.

Symptoms Of Osteoarthritis - OA Symptoms - OA Knee Pain OA Knee Pain

The main symptoms of OA are:

Pain

Pain occurs when you move the affected joint or at the end of the day. Those with severe osteoarthritis may feel pain more often.

Stiffness

Stiffness occurs when you have rested or remained still for a prolonged period of time, but usually wears away as you move.

Grinding

A grating sensation, also known as crepitus, occurs when you move the affected joint.

Swelling

Swelling can come in two forms - hard and soft. Hard swelling is caused by osteophytes, which are bony lumps that grow on and around the joints of the knee, while soft swelling is caused by the synovial fluid in a joint thickening. Both forms can make muscles look thin or wasted.

Lack of Movement

Due to one or more of the above symptoms, you may have trouble moving your joints as freely as you once did. Sometimes your mobility might be affected due to muscles wasting or your joint not being as stable as it was before.

If symptoms are persistent, you should book an appointment with your GP so they can carry out an examination and determine the best course of treatment. Click here to read about how OA is diagnosed.

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​Occupational risk OA


There is a strong link between our work and our health. We all spend a lot of time in our jobs and so it is important to analyse the risks involved and understand how our job can affect our health. With osteoarthritis, there can be many risk factors to consider at work. It is vital to assess what factors increase the risk of developing OA and how OA can be managed at work.

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​Cloudy With A Chance Of Pain


Many people experiencing knee pain express concerns or complaints about certain weather condition causing painful episodes or an increase in usual chronic pain. As this is quite common, it was a surprise to find that there doesn’t currently exist any scientific data or research on the existence of a relationship between the weather and pain; that is until now.

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​5 things you're experiencing that may be a result of OA


Cartilage plays an incredibly important role in joints, being firm and flexible, but softer than bone. Cartilage covers bone surfaces where they intersect and move against each other, to allow smooth joint movement. However, like other parts of the body, cartilage can wear down over time and this can lead to degenerative arthritis, which is also known as osteoarthritis. This condition is one of the most common joint disorders in the Western world.

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Top 10 Lifestyle & Healthy Eating Tips for Before & After Surgery


Written for OA Knee Pain by Registered Dietician Nichola Ludlam-Raine. Nichola works as an NHS, freelance and private dietician and has appeared on BBC breakfast a number of times to provide her expert opinion. Here she tells us about the top 10 lifestyle and healthy eating tips for before and after surgery.

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS)


Patellofemoral pain syndrome, also known as chondromalacia patella or anterior knee pain, is a common injury amongst runners both experienced and beginner. It is an overuse injury that is difficult to determine, but could be a result of biomechanics or muscular faults. The condition is not limited to one knee and can be linked to other injuries.

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Patella Fracture


A broken kneecap is one of the less likely knee injuries but can be incredibly painful and debilitating to those that do suffer from one. They are usually caused by the result of a direct blow to the knee, which can happen by falling forward, in a car accident or while playing sports such as football and rugby.

Torn Cartilage Injury


A torn cartilage injury, also referred to as a meniscus tear injury, is one of the most common knee injuries amongst those aged over 65 and athletes who play contact sports, like football and rugby, or those that involve jumping, such as basketball.

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​What causes OA


Although the precise cause of osteoarthritis is not known, predisposing factors include injury to the joint, other conditions such as gout or rheumatoid arthritis, congenital abnormalities, age, family history and obesity. Secondary osteoarthritis can occur if the condition is caused by another disease or condition.

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Osteochondritis Dissecans


Osteochondritis dissecans, or OCD, is a rare condition caused when a fragment of bone becomes loose in the joint. The condition’s cause differs depending on your age. For adults, OCD forms after the physis or epiphyseal plate has closed, while for young people, it can occur while still growing.

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Osgood-Schlatter Disease


Osgood-Schlatter disease, sometimes referred to as Osgood's or OSD, is a condition that causes the bones, cartilage and tendons at the top of the shinbone or tibia where the patellar tendon is attached to become inflamed. The syndrome is most commonly found amongst active young people aged 8 to 15 years old but has also been known to affect some adults too.