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The most important thing to remember when you're suffering from any form of arthritis is that you're not alone. There are other people who have encountered the same issues as you and more importantly have not let it hold them back. Likewise there are numerous resources, organisations and meetings bringing together sufferers and professionals to discuss the condition and look at ways to effectively manage it.

We've pulled together a number of event resources from leading charities and organisations into one page to help make your search for a local event even easier:

Arthritis Research UK Events & Activities

Arthritis Research UK runs a variety of fundraising events and has something for everyone, from running a marathon to dog sledding challenges and even trekking to Everest base camp.

You can either take part in these events, follow their progress, cheer them on in person or simply donate to the cause.

Arthritis Care Events & Activities

The organisation runs a host of events and activities which can be broken down as follows:

Living well with Arthritis

Working alongside community groups and health and social care professionals, our trained volunteer champions encourage you to take a proactive role in managing the physical, mental and emotional aspects of arthritis.

Their range of services are provided through peer to peer support, over the phone, at drop-ins, in groups or one on one.

Get active!

Volunteers work with you to support and encourage an active lifestyle. Activities can include tai chi, seated exercise sessions and complementary therapies for a happier and healthier lifestyle.

Self management courses and workshops

We provide a number of group sessions to help you make improvements in your quality of life.

Delivered by trained volunteers, topics cover:

  • communication
  • pain management
  • activity and exercise
  • finance welfare and employment
  • managing change and goal setting

Young people and families

Juvenile arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), lupus and other musculoskeletal conditions, can have a devastating effect on children and young people.

Often excluded from social situations because of their condition, many young people with arthritis do not have the opportunity to develop life skills in the same way as their peers.

Our Young People and Families service complements medical treatment by providing additional social and emotional support.

Children and young people living with arthritis will benefit from:

  • reduced isolation
  • increased resilience
  • a more positive outlook

Parents and family members will achieve a greater understanding of their child's condition, receive helpful information and develop an extended support network.

Staying connected in later life

A mentoring and befriending service to help older people at risk of isolation, and to assist carers in better understanding their role.

It will help older people:

  • cope better with their condition
  • make positive changes
  • feel less isolated
  • have improved health and well-being
  • regain an activity role in their community

The Staying Connected service is currently only available in Northern Ireland and Nairn in Scotland.

The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS) Events & Activities

Every hour of every day, 3 people are diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Every day 3 children and young people are diagnosed with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

You can challenge yourself by taking part in one of the many events the organisation offer in order to make a difference and change the lives of those living with this type of disease.

Arthritis Foundation

Just about everywhere, the Arthritis Foundation hosts fun events that raise awareness and funds for arthritis research and the many programs and services we offer. They’re great places to make a difference as well as meet other JA (Juvenile Arthritis) families.

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